Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Why doing protests against work at Amazon?

15 comments:

  1. So, Oleg, looks like your protest is over due to settlement? :X

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    1. Hey man, sorry for the late response. Whether your comment is in support or against me, thank you for your comment. Amazon created a lot of problems for me during the last couple of weeks and I was not able to respond timely. I even did not update my blog.

      Firstly, I would be very glad to sign a settlement with Amazon. If Amazon would agree to change its policies, remove 2 leadership principles and give a relief to all the employees who suffered, I would be so glad to stop protesting. This would allow to help to avoid bloody war. Initially, that was a goal of protests: to force Amazon to become a human company and to stop oppression for everyone (not for me only). But I have a serious doubt that Amazon would ever agree for that.

      I tried to do litigation with them, but they have very expensive attorneys, thus I should not fight alone. In my litigation I did not ask for any specified amount of money apart from medical expenses caused by Amazon and any amounts which are up to the jury. Instead, I made around 20 non-monetary claims for relief which are for public interest and for the justice. These claims are to help everybody who suffered from Amazon and to everybody who will suffer. Like change Amazon policies, remove leadership principle etc. Some of them are listed here:
      http://www.churyumov.com/2019/02/z.html

      That's why my next goal is to start class action instead of regular single litigation: join together hundreds and even thousands of employees who suffered from the same policies. If number of plaintiffs is big, attorneys willingly agree to represent us on a contingency basis.

      Earlier, Amazon already offered me [small piece of shit] a bit of money to make me agree to quit voluntary. Of course I refused.

      I use to delete some of Anonymous comments with hate speech, mockery and stuff like that. Exceptions for me are:
      (1) if you disclose your real name and account OR
      (2) if you confirm that you work for Amazon (still staying Anonymous) OR
      (3) if your comments are not to mock or harass me
      So I am sorry beforehand if I delete your future comments if you are the same person from Amazon who harassed me earlier

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  2. Oh no, I'm not from Amazon. The policies...they're often in place, in various organizations, but the whole different story is to abide by them - often, it's not the case, so they don't provide too much relief in practice. I took a look at the link to Amazon "leadership principles" - well, that page had described pretty much the cornerstones of the modern corporate world and typical operations of any large US corp. They're very bad, but this is the sad reality... hope some real changes will come through one day.

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    1. Well, you can take a look at leadership principles of other corporations and compare. They are not the same

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    2. The practice is about the same, I can assure you. Amazon might be just a bit worse than others - but these corporate issues are all over the place.

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    3. let's compare with any random company. Say Procter and Gamble.

      PG: "The Interests of the Company and the Individual Are Inseparable"
      Amazon: "Interests of the company are always in priority"

      PG: "We support families"
      Amazon: "We separate families"

      etc etc

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    4. You're talking about policies....I'm talking about real life/things in practice and all the policy (and law) violations (which are daily practice in US big corp). These 2 things have an ocean between them...

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    5. I agree other companies are not perfect. But policy is the rule and the law in the company. In Amazon, supervisor always can excuse himself saying "policy encourages me to do that". Fascist Germany also had policies

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    6. I see, so their managers can cite bad policies to their defense. In general, enacting the right policy is only 50% of the fight. For example, US law prohibits discrimination and almost any company here had anti-discrimination policy in place (often sham, on paper)...nevertheless, there's heavy discrimination being practiced by most companies (race, gender, age, disability - the reality is pretty grim and very different from enacted policies). The 2nd, very difficult, half of the fight is to actually enforce these policies.

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    7. Oh pretty much most of them, it's unspoken thing. Aside from personal experiences.. media is full of info about this, many lawsuits and this is a big political issue. Widespread hiring discrimination against African-Americans in most industries, age discrimination is pretty much everywhere (after age 40-45), against women in tech/engineering/skilled trades, etc, etc. Medical industry is probably the least discriminatory (thanks to staff shortages).

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    8. There is at least one example of discrimination even in the most nice company. But the topic here is about statistics. And statistics at Amazon is much worse. In particular thanks to policies. Especially outrageous cases (children deaths etc).

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    9. Discrimination doesn't make it into statistics. Real life situation with discrimination is horrible (though it's worse in developing countries outside the States, but it doesn't make our situation "better"). Do you think your case made it into Amazon statistics? Of course not - just like in other companies, there's cover up. Massive cover ups, all the time - there's little to no way to prove discrimination had occurred. (things like children deaths are outrageous cases that go beyond discrimination issue. Though a lot of adults lost their health and life too - because of being discriminated against and silenced)

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    10. That is also the point. Amazon is worse not only in terms of quantity. It is quality of cases also. Can you imagine that say in Google or Facebook employee is prevented to see her dying parent and asked to stay at work instead?

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  3. But of course, punishing Amazon for such practices will make other companies more afraid to commit these types of violations, as legal precedent would be created

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